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Photobook: Images in Transition by David Pace & Stephen Wirtz

Simon Skinner - 4 months ago

Sending a photographic image quickly from one location to another was first accomplished early in the 20th century using the ‘Belinograph,’ a device developed by French photographer and inventor Edouard Belin to send photographic images over telephone and telegraph wires. These ‘Belinograms’ were soon referred to as ‘wirephotos’. Wirephoto technology flourished in the 1930s and 1940s, especially during World War II when newspaper readers were eager for images from the front.

In this new book from Schilt Publishing, Images in Transition, David Pace and Stephen Wirtz manipulate and transform these wirephotos to incredible effect,
raising questions about the technologies of image making and image transmission, the notion of truth in journalism, and the role of propaganda in news photography.

Images in Transition

Pace and Wirtz’ process begins with an extensive collection of originals, [assembled by Wirtz over a period of many years]. They scan the images, radically re-cropping and dramatically enlarging portions of the archival wirephotos. Their croppings and enlargements expose the artefacts of the wirephoto technology; the dots, lines, irregularities and retouchings from the war years. But the transformations introduced by Pace and Wirtz not only extend, but also reverse, the intentions of the wartime retouchers. Instead of obscuring the dots and lines to create a clearer image, Pace and Wirtz reveal and enhance the dots and lines, exposing the technological processes that produced the images.

Images in Transition

Instead of retouching the images to create an illusion of reality, they make visible the manipulation of the images that were published as news. Instead of enhancing the content to support a narrative of just war and ethical victory, their dramatic enlargements transform wartime content into near-abstraction, creating a subtle counter-narrative.

Images in Transition

By exposing the artefacts of wirephoto technology and the actions of the human hands that retouched the images, their work highlights, transforms, and subverts the intention, the content, and the process of these wartime photographs.

Images in Transition

Images in Transition by David Pace & Stephen Wirtz
Published by: Schilt Publishing
Design
: Victor Levie, LevievanderMeer
Essay: Mark Murrmann
Format: 24 x 30 cm
Hardback
144 pages with approx. 70 images in full colour
Price: £50
ISBN 978 90 5330 916 2

About the author

Read Photobook: Images in Transition by David Pace & Stephen Wirtz

Simon Skinner

Co-founder // Editor

Having spent many years working in various pockets of the music industry, and always with a camera in hand, Simon has worked with organisations such as Warner/Chappell, Food Records and ultimately, co-founding the innovative independent record label, Izumi Records before moving fully into the world of publishing in 2007. Amongst numerous other projects in the last decade, he has been responsible for a number of specialist photo trade magazines and journals for the filmmaking and photography communities, along with a coffee table book entitled, "Great Britons of Photography' which he produced with Peter Dench and Leica. Now heading up PhotoBite, Simon and the team have set themselves a task of delivering informative and inspirational content for photographers of all levels, from the beginner, shooting with smartphones, to the seasoned photographer and filmmaker.

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